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Course Offerings

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Introductory Core Courses
Intermediate Core Courses
Elective Courses: 200 Level
Elective Courses: 300 Level
Honors and Independent Study

Note: Students are encouraged to review the Department of Economics website for more information about the economics major. Students should speak with an adviser in the department to help them plan their major. Advisers are located at 19 West Fourth Street, Rooms 836 and 837.

In the list of courses below, some courses are designated either "P" or "T" (or both). "P" alone represents courses to be taken only by students in the policy concentration; "T" alone represents courses to be taken only by students in the theory concentration; and "P, T" represents courses that may be taken by students in either concentration.

Economics courses for majors fall into several categories: introductory and intermediate core courses; elective courses at the 200 and 300 level; and special honors courses. Students must pay careful attention to prerequisites, as they are strictly enforced in this sequential major.

Students should refer to Albert for up-to-date listings of 200 and 300 level elective course offerings each semester.

First-Year Core Courses

Introduction to Macroeconomics (P, T)
ECON-UA 1 Formerly Economic Principles I. Prerequisite: Algebra and Calculus (MATH-UA 9) or equivalent. Offered every semester. 4 points.
Focuses on the economy as a whole (the "macroeconomy"). Begins with the meaning and measurement of important macroeconomic data (on unemployment, inflation, and production), then turns to the behavior of the overall economy. Topics include long-run economic growth and the standard of living; the causes and consequences of economic booms and recessions; the banking system and the Federal Reserve; the stock and bond markets; and the role of government policy.

Introduction to Microeconomics (P, T)
ECON-UA 2 Formerly Economic Principles II. Prerequisite: Algebra and Calculus (MATH-UA 9) or equivalent. Offered every semester. 4 points.
Focuses on individual economic decision-makers—households, business firms, and government agencies—and how they are linked together. The emphasis is on decision making by households and firms and how these decisions shape our economic life. Explores the different environments in which businesses sell their products, hire workers, and raise funds to expand their operations; the economic effects of trade between nations; and the effects of various government policies, such as minimum-wage legislation, rent controls, antitrust laws, and more.

Statistics (P)
ECON-UA 18 Prerequisite for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: Mathematics for Economics I (MATH-UA 211). Prerequisite for students who entered NYU before Fall 2012: Calculus I (MATH-UA 121) Restrictions: not open to any student who has taken Analytical Statistics (ECON-UA 20); not open to seniors. Offered every semester. 4 points.
Introduction to statistics. Topics: descriptive statistics; introduction to probability; sampling; statistical inferences concerning means, standard deviations, and proportions; analysis of variance; linear regressions; and correlation. Laboratory periods cover sample problems drawn primarily from economics. Meets three times a week, plus a lab session.

Analytical Statistics (T)
ECON-UA 20 Prerequisite for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: Mathematics for Economics II (MATH-UA 212). Prerequisites for students who entered before Fall 2012: Calculus II (MATH-UA 122) and corequisite Calculus III (MATH-UA 123). Restriction: not open to any student who has taken Statistics (ECON-UA 18); not open to seniors. Offered in the spring. 4 points.
Introduction to statistical reasoning. Topics covered include descriptive statistics, calculation of moments, probability theory, an introduction to distribution theory, and an introduction to inference. Lab sessions enable the student to run a wide variety of computer experiments and to simulate all distributions that are discussed, as well as to experiment with a variety of statistical procedures.

Second-Year Core Courses

Note applying only to students who entered NYU before Fall 2012: Topics in Econometrics (ECON-UA 380) is an elective course, not a core course.

Intermediate Microeconomics (P)
ECON-UA 10 Prerequisites for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2) and Mathematics for Economics II (MATH-UA 212). Prerequisites for students who entered NYU before Fall 2012: Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2) and Calculus I (MATH-UA 121) or Mathematics for Economics I (MATH-UA 211). Restriction only for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: not open to seniors. Offered every semester. 4 points.
Examines the manner in which producers, consumers, and resource owners acting through the market determine the prices and output of goods, the allocation of productive resources, and the functional distribution of incomes. The price system is seen as a network of interrelated decisions, with the market process serving to communicate information to decision makers.

Microeconomics (P, T)
ECON-UA 11 Prerequisites for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2) and Mathematics for Economics II (ECON-UA 212). Prerequisites for students who entered NYU before Fall 2012: Mathematics for Economists (ECON-UA 6), Analytical Statistics (ECON-UA 20), and Calculus III (MATH-UA 123). Restriction: not open to seniors. Offered in the fall. 4 points.
Rigorous examination of consumer choice, profit-maximizing behavior on the part of firms, and equilibrium in product markets. Topics include choice under uncertainty, strategic interactions between firms in noncompetitive environments, intertemporal decision making, and investment in public goods.

Intermediate Macroeconomics (P)
ECON-UA 12 Prerequisites for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10). Prerequisites for students who entered NYU before Fall 2012: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1), Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), and Calculus I (MATH-UA 121) or Mathematics for Economics I (MATH-UA 211). Restriction only for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: not open to seniors. Offered every semester. 4 points.
Study of aggregate economic analysis with special attention paid to the determination of the level of income, employment, and inflation. Critically examines both the theories and the policies associated with them.

Macroeconomics (P, T)
ECON-UA 13 Prerequisite for students who enter NYU Fall 2012 or later: either Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10) or Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11). Prerequisites for students who entered NYU before Fall 2012: Mathematics for Economists (ECON-UA 6), Analytical Statistics (ECON-UA 20), and Calculus III (MATH-UA 123). Restriction: not open to seniors. Offered in the spring. 4 points.
Study of aggregate economic analysis, with attention paid to the determination of the level of income, employment, and inflation. Critically examines both the theories and the policies associated with them. This course involves more formal analysis than that used in ECON-UA 12.

International Economics (P)
ECON-UA 238 Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2). Offered every semester. 4 points.
Focuses on international trade in goods, services, and capital. It serves as an introduction to international economic issues and as preparation for the department's more advanced course Topics in the Global Economy (ECON-UA 324). The issues discussed include gains from trade and their distribution; analysis of protectionism; strategic trade barriers; the trade deficit; exchange rate determination; and government intervention in foreign exchange markets.

Introduction to Econometrics (P, T)
ECON-UA 266 Prerequisite: either Statistics (ECON-UA 18) or Analytical Statistics (ECON-UA 20). Restriction: not open to any student who has taken Topics in Econometrics (ECON-UA 380). Offered in the fall. 4 points.
Application of statistics and economic theory to problems of formulating and estimating models of economic behavior. Matrix algebra is developed as the main tool of analysis in regression. Acquaints students with basic estimation theory and techniques in the regression framework and covers extensions such as specification error tests, heteroskedasticity, errors in variables, and simple time series models. An introduction to simultaneous equation modes and the concept of identification is provided.

Topics in Econometrics (P)
ECON-UA 380 Prerequisite: Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10), Intermediate Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 12) and Statistics (ECON-UA 18). Restriction: not open to any student who has taken Introduction to Econometrics (ECON-UA 266). Offered every semester. 4 points.
Examines a number of important areas of econometrics. The topics covered include identification and estimation of simultaneous equations models; model specification and testing; estimation of discrete choice models; and the analysis of duration models. In addition to covering the relevant theoretical issues, the course includes the application of these methods to economic data.

Elective Courses: 200 Level

Economic History of the United States (P, T)
ECON-UA 205 Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2); or Introduction to Economic Analysis (ECON-UA 5). Offered every year. 4 points.
Analytic survey of the structure of the U.S. economy. National income and its distribution; population and land; capital accumulation and development of financial institutions; labor and labor unions; technological change; the market, both domestic and foreign; and the economic effects of government policy.

History of Economic Thought (P, T)
ECON-UA 206 Formerly ECON-UA 106. Prerequisite: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1). Restriction: not open to any student who has taken ECON-UA 106. Offered every semester. 4 points.
Begins with a short introduction to mercantilism, then moves to the classical school, examining the contributions of its main figures (Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, Mill, and others). Ends with Marx's reaction to classical doctrines and the Marginalist Revolution of the late 19th century, which set the foundation of modern neoclassical economics. Conceptually, covers a variety of topics but focuses on two main entities: first, the normative aspects of the debate on the factors determining the value of commodities and the related issue of the principles that ought to govern the allocation of wealth; and second, various theories of economic growth and historical change, including predictions made on the future of capitalism.

Ethics and Economics (P, T)
ECON-UA 207 Prerequisite: Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2) or Introduction to Economic Analysis (ECON-UA 5). Offered every year. 4 points.
Study of the interface between ethical and economic theories. Specific topics covered include a brief overview of various ethical ideas, an analysis of the ethical presuppositions of modern economic theory (especially welfare economics), utilitarian ethics, the moral status of free exchange, the ethical implications of imperfect knowledge between bargaining parties, cost-benefit analysis and human rights, the economic content of the "general welfare," and laissez-faire.

Policy Ideas in the History of Economic Thought (P)
ECON-UA 208 Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2). Offered every year. 4 points.
Economic policy has been important since the beginning of systematic economic thought. This course examines a few selected policy recommendations drawn from classical to present-day economic thought. The examined policies may vary from year to year. Some of the thinkers are Adam Smith, Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, Philip Wicksteed, Arthur C. Pigou, John Maynard Keynes, Friedrich Hayek, and such modern behavioral economists as Richard Thaler. The topics range widely: the protection of domestic industry, use of taxes to deal with external effects, property rights, the government direction of investment, and alternatives to revealed preference as a welfare standard.

Game Theory and Strategy (P)
ECON-UA 216 Prerequisites: Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), and Calculus I (MATH-UA 121) or Mathematics for Economics I (MATH-UA 211). Offered every year. 4 points.
Indicated for students with an interest in learning how to apply game theoretical analysis to a variety of disciplines. The course aims to provide a mostly applied overview of game theoretical concepts and emphasizes their use in real-world situations. By the end of the course, students should have developed tools that will allow them to formally analyze outcomes in strategic situations.

Financial Crises (P)
ECON-UA 225 Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2). Offered every year. 4 points.
Allows students to understand the origin and evolution of financial crises. Various policy options that may prevent and mitigate financial crises and the restructuring of the global financial architecture to prevent or limit future crises are examined. Although the course focuses mostly on the United States and on the most recent financial crisis, it will also examine earlier financial crises in the United States (such as the Great Depression) and past financial bubbles, such as the 17th century Dutch Tulip mania and the 1997 Asian crisis.

Urban Economics (P, T)
ECON-UA 227 Identical to SCA-UA 751. Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2); or Introduction to Economic Analysis (ECON-UA 5). Offered every semester. 4 points.
The city as an economic organization. Urbanization trends, functional specialization, and the nature of growth within the city; organization of economic activity within the city and its outlying areas, the organization of the labor market, and problems of urban poverty; the urban public economy; housing and land-use problems; transportation problems; and special problems within the public sector.

Money and Banking (P, T)
ECON-UA 231 Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), or Introduction to Economic Analysis (ECON-UA 5). Offered every semester. 4 points.
Money supply; banking as an industry; banks as suppliers of money; the Federal Reserve System and monetary control; monetary theory; and contemporary monetary policy issues.

Poverty and Income Distribution (P, T)
ECON-UA 233 Prerequisite: Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2) or Introduction to Economic Analysis (ECON-UA 5). Offered every year. 4 points.
Defines poverty and welfare. Analyzes who the poor are, why some people are rich and others poor, equality of opportunity, income and status, inequality, trends in the degree of inequality, government's role in income distribution, and international comparisons of inequality.

Gender and Choices (P, T)
ECON-UA 252 Identical to SCA-UA 719. Prerequisite: Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2) or Introduction to Economic Analysis (ECON-UA 5). Offered every year. 4 points.
Examines important economic influences on decisions women make concerning labor force participation and family. Theory of labor market behavior and discrimination, as well as public policy options.

Privatization (P)
ECON-UA 270 Prerequisites: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2). Offered every year. 4 points.
Analyzes the principles and practices underlying the privatization of public enterprises and governmental functions. After evaluating the criticism directed at public ownership, the course examines an alternative to privatization: reforming state-owned enterprises and public administration, using examples from the United States, Great Britain, and New Zealand. Various issues of privatization (such as the roles of ownership and competition in stimulating efficiency, the implications of separation of ownership from management in distinguishing between private and public enterprises, conditions for successful divestiture programs, privatization's employment impact, and contracting out of government services) are discussed both in principle and via examples from industrial, transitional, and less-developed economies.

Topics in Economic Analysis I (P)
ECON-UA 290 Prerequisite: Introduction to Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 1) and Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2). Offered every year. 4 points.
A mid-level undergraduate elective course offered to encourage department or visiting faculty who wish to give courses in fields that are not in the permanent course offerings. The exact topic of this course is announced before registration each year. Such "topics courses" are not given regularly, and a specific topic presented in any one semester is unlikely to be repeated. Students are allowed to count only one such topics course for the major.

Politics and Finance: Honors Seminar (P)
ECON-UA 296 Identical to POL-UA 396. Prerequisites: Introduction to Microeconomics (ECON-UA 2), Power and Politics in America (POL-UA 300), 3.5 GPA, and permission of the Department of Politics. Offered every year. 4 points.
Examines how legislation and regulation influence the structure of financial markets and how players in these markets intervene in the political process to create or modify legislative and regulatory outcomes. Particular emphasis is placed on the United States. International comparisons are also presented. The course assumes that students have had exposure to microeconomics and finance but not to political theory. A brief introduction to political theory is provided. The approach is similar to that used in microeconomics, except that transactions are made through voting institutions rather than through economic exchange.

Elective Courses: 300 Level

Note: For all courses listed below, Statistics (P) (ECON-UA 18) is a prerequisite for policy electives, and Introduction to Econometrics (T) (ECON-UA 266) is a prerequisite for theory electives. Additional prerequisites are listed for each course.

Strategic Decision Theory (T)
ECON-UA 310 Prerequisite: Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11). Offered every year. 4 points.
Introduction to noncooperative game theory. Focuses on a rigorous development of the basic theory with economic applications such as competition among oligopolists, how standards are set, auction theory, and bargaining. The formal topics include games in strategic form, Bayesian games, and games in extensive form.

Industrial Organization (P)
ECON-UA 316 Prerequisite: Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10). Offered every semester. 4 points.
Analysis of the structure, conduct, and performance of firms and industries. Involves the development of a theoretical basis for evaluating performance. Analysis of competition as a state of affairs versus competition as a process. The effects of advertising, economic concentration, and innovation on prices and production. Overall survey of contemporary antitrust law and economics.

Market Structure and Performance (T)
ECON-UA 317 Prerequisite: Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11). Offered every other year. 4 points.
Designed to familiarize students with a modern approach to industrial organization economics. The modern approach relies extensively on the use of game-theoretic tools to model strategic market behavior and the use of econometric methods for testing hypotheses regarding firm conduct and market performance. In particular, the course analyzes profit-maximizing business strategies of firms with market power, as well as strategic interactions among firms in various types of imperfectly competitive markets. The course addresses both static modes of competition as well as dynamic competition in research and development and product design. The course also examines the scope of effective public policies designed to improve market performance. Throughout the course, mathematical-based models are used to develop the relevant concepts and test the pertinent theories of firm behavior.

Economic Development (P, T)
ECON-UA 323 Prerequisites: Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10), Intermediate Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 12), and International Economics (ECON-UA 238); or Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11) and Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 13). Offered every year. 4 points.
Studies the problem of economic underdevelopment, with special reference to the countries of Asia, Latin America, and Africa. The building blocks of economic theory are used to understand the historical experiences of these countries. Macroeconomic topics covered include economic growth, income distribution, and poverty, with particular emphasis on the concept of underdevelopment as a circular, self-reinforcing trap. Microeconomic topics include the study of particular markets that are especially relevant to developing countries: those for land, labor, and credit. Notions of market fragmentation, limited information, and incentive problems receive emphasis. Ends with international issues: trading patterns, capital flows, and global financial crises are studied from the viewpoint of developing countries.

Economics of Energy and the Environment (P, T)
ECON-UA 326 Prerequisite: Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10) or Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11). Offered every year. 4 points.
Economic analysis of major policy issues in energy and the environment, both domestic and international. Emphasis on market solutions to various problems and market limitations in the allocation of environmental resources. Energy issues focus on OPEC and world oil markets, with attention to reducing oil import vulnerability; taxation and regulation of production and consumption; conservation of natural resources; and the transition to alternative energy sources. Environmental issues include policies to reduce pollution. Substantial attention is paid to global warming caused by consumption of fossil fuels.

Ownership and Corporate Control in Advanced and Transition Economies (P, T)
ECON-UA 340 Prerequisite: Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10) or Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11). Offered every year. 4 points.
Discusses the conceptual foundations and empirical evidence concerning the effects of private ownership on corporate performance. The corporate control mechanisms in the United States, Germany, Japan, and the emerging market economies of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the role of capital markets (takeovers and other shareholder control devices), banks and other financial institutions, and various corporate institutions (such as boards of directors and meetings of shareholders) in facilitating or hindering corporate control and the efficient allocation of resources.

Behavioral Economics (P)
ECON-UA 342 Prerequisites: Topics in Econometrics (ECON-UA 380) and Calculus II (MATH-UA 122) or Mathematics for Economics II (MATH-UA 212); or Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11) and Introduction to Econometrics (ECON-UA 266). Offered every year. 4 points.
Introduces students to the field of behavioral economics, which seeks to insert more behavioral realism into economic theory. Topics covered include, but are not restricted to, prospect theory, mental accounting, other-regarding preferences, and hyperbolic discounting. We usually approach a topic by examining evidence of some departure from the assumptions made in the canonical economic model. We then ask how such departures can be formalized theoretically and how the resulting models can be tested empirically.

Political Economy (T)
ECON-UA 345 Prerequisite: Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11). Offered every year. 4 points.
Introduces the emerging field of formal political economy. The variety of ways in which economists and political scientists think about political science and the interplay of political science and economics are analyzed. The first part of the course focuses on the formal modeling of political behavior and political institutions; the theory of social choice (how groups of rational individuals make decisions) and collective action (how groups of rational individuals take action) are analyzed. The second part of the course discusses the connection between politics and economics and investigates the effect of political variables on the determination of economic outcomes. Some questions that are answered: How can special groups of individuals enhance their well-being by political action? What is lobbying? What is the effect of contributions on political outcomes?

Labor Economics (P, T)
ECON-UA 351 Prerequisite: Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10) or Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11). Offered every semester. 4 points.
Analyzes the functioning of the labor market in both theoretical and statistical terms. Examines the determinants of wage and employment levels in perfect and imperfect labor markets, including the concept of education and training as human capital. Models of labor market dynamics are also examined, including those of job search and matching. The role of public policy in the functioning of labor markets is highlighted throughout.

Public Economics (P, T)
ECON-UA 353 Prerequisite: Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10) or Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11). Offered every semester. 4 points.
In alternate years, stresses policy implications and the development of theory. Analysis of government economic policies and behavior. Normative and positive economics; the fundamental welfare theorems. What goods should the government provide (public goods)? When should the government tax private behavior (externalities)? Income redistribution and the welfare program. Who pays the tax (tax incidence)? The role of debt policy. On what should taxes be levied (optimal taxation)?

Experimental Economics (P, T)
ECON-UA 360 Prerequisite: Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10) or Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11). Offered every year. 4 points.
Experimental economics is predicated on the belief that economics, like other sciences, can be a laboratory science where economic theories are tested, rejected, and revised. This course reviews the methodology of doing such laboratory experiments and investigates the use of experiments in a wide variety of fields. These include competitive markets, auctions, public goods theory, labor economics, game theory, and individual choice theory. The course functions as a research seminar in which students present their work as it progresses during the semester. Students also get exposure to the experimental laboratory in the Department of Economics and the research performed there.

Elements of Financial Economics (T)
ECON-UA 363 Prerequisite: Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11). Restriction: open to students from the Stern School of Business only if FINC-UB 43 has not been taken. Offered every year. 4 points.
Provides theoretical tools for understanding the operation and economic role of asset markets in the financial system. Develops the theory of decision making under uncertainty and techniques for portfolio choice and efficient risk sharing. Develops static and dynamic models of asset markets with applications to efficiency, arbitrage pricing, and the use and pricing of derivative securities.

Advanced Micro Theory (T)
ECON-UA 365 Prerequisite: Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11). Offered every other year. 4 points.
Designed to introduce students to some of the main model-building techniques that have been developed by microeconomists. Intended for advanced undergraduates who have taken the necessary preparatory courses in economics and mathematics. Three basic topics are covered. The first topic is the static theory of consumer behavior both in a certain world and in an uncertain world. The second topic is the theory of general equilibrium. The third topic is the theory of dynamic optimization. In addition to the coverage of the economics, the advanced mathematical techniques that are needed to understand the material are reviewed.

Advanced Macroeconomics and Finance (T)
ECON-UA 367 Prerequisites: Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11), Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 13), and Analytical Statistics (ECON-UA 20), or permission of the instructor. Offered every year. 4 points.
Studies dynamic theories of equilibrium with optimizing agents who face risky returns and uncertain government policies that influence their decisions. We study inflations and hyperinflations; theories of pricing bonds and equity and how well they work empirically; Social Security reform; causes and cures of financial panics; theories of optimal monetary and fiscal policy; and search theory and other applications of dynamic programming.

Financial Economics (P)
ECON-UA 368 Prerequisite: Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10) and Intermediate Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 12). Restriction: not open to students from the Stern School of Business. Offered every year. 4 points.
Provides theoretical and practical tools for understanding the operation of financial markets, the meaning of risk, and its relation to financial return. Also develops concepts of systematic versus idiosyncratic risk, market efficiency, the equilibrium determination of interest rates both in the overnight, interbank lending market and in the market for corporate debt, term and default premia in the bond market, and average excess stock returns in the equity market.

Topics in Economic Theory (T)
ECON-UA 375 Prerequisites: Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11) and Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 13). May not be taken for credit in addition to ECON-UA 370. Offered every year. 4 points.
Explores issues in economic theory using the tools learned in macroeconomics and microeconomics. Focuses on a particular issue each term.

Topics in Economic Analysis II (P)
ECON-UA 390 Prerequisites: Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10) and/or Intermediate Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 12). Offered every year. 4 points.
An advanced undergraduate elective course offered to encourage department or visiting faculty who wish to give courses in fields that are not in the permanent course offerings. The exact topic of this course is announced before registration each year. Such "topics courses" are not given regularly and a specific topic presented in any one semester is unlikely to be repeated. Students are allowed to count only one such topics course for the major.

Advanced Econometrics (P, T)
ECON-UA 402 Prerequisite: Introduction to Econometrics (ECON-UA 266) or Topics in Econometrics (ECON-UA 380). Offered every year. 4 points.
Covers a range of techniques in econometrics that are widely used in applied microeconomics, macroeconomics, and other fields. Although this is a course designed for honors economics majors, students who are not pursuing honors but still satisfy the GPA requirements (3.65 overall and in economics courses) and meet the prerequisite are encouraged to take this course. The class aims at preparing students for carrying out empirical research in economics, and there is emphasis on the relationship between economic models and observable data. We cover nonlinear methods, and a selection of topics in panel and time-series data.

Honors and Independent Study

Honors Tutorial (P, T)
ECON-UA 410 Prerequisites: Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10), Intermediate Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 12) and Topics in Econometrics (ECON-UA 380); or Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11), Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 13), and Introduction to Econometrics (ECON-UA 266); 3.65 GPA in the major and the College; permission of the instructor required. Restriction: open only to students in the honors track. Offered in the fall. 4 points.
Aims to train students to write on economic topics and perform economic analysis efficiently, as well as to develop theoretical skills. This course is in preparation for and is a prerequisite to the Honors Thesis (ECON-UA 450) course. Once a week, two students each present a paper on their original research. The students not presenting that week, as well as the instructor, critique the content and the form of the paper as well as the presentation. Each paper is to be revised and submitted to the instructor with a cover sheet that indicates how the student dealt with each of the criticisms.

Honors Thesis (P, T)
ECON-UA 450 Formerly ECON-UA 400. Prerequisite: Honors Tutorial (ECON-UA 410); 3.65 GPA in the major and the College. Restriction: open only to students in the honors track. Offered in the spring. 4 points.
Students interested in pursuing an Honors Thesis should meet with the director of undergraduate studies in the spring semester of their junior year.

Independent Study (P, T)
ECON-UA 997, 998 Prerequisites: Intermediate Microeconomics (ECON-UA 10) and Intermediate Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 12); or Microeconomics (ECON-UA 11) and Macroeconomics (ECON-UA 13); 3.5 GPA; and permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Restrictions: No more than a total of 8 points of independent study may be taken; independent study does not count towards the major requirements. Offered every semester. 1 to 4 points per term.
The student engages in intensive independent study of an important economic topic under the direction of a departmental faculty member. The results of the study are embodied in a report or paper to be specified required by the instructor.